Adults Returning to College Ought to Consider a General Studies Degree Plan

Returning to school as an adult can be a frightening notion, not just for the prospective student but in most instances for the entire family as well. For adults, the decision to return to school might have substantial implications nevertheless if the opportunity comes along, seize the moment. It is by far one of the most revitalizing soul-searching journeys a person can take, and if nothing else, you will indeed learn a thing or two about yourself because returning to college as an adult is a spot-on test of one’s character. If I could make just one recommendation to an adult person contemplating a return to school, it would be to consider a general studies degree plan first.

As if the admissions process itself is not challenging enough, once accepted there is still; the financial aid process, academic advisement, degree planning, purchasing books, and just wait till the first full day of classes on campus, to say the least, returning to school is about perseverance. If one is not careful, a poorly planned academic program can inevitably cost the student both time and money. Although considering personal aspirations and educational goals are highly important in the context of an end game outcome, with respect to the first, or even second semester back in school as an adult, it is not as significant as one might think.

Although academic advisers are sometimes inclined to suggest that major and minor selections need to be declared at the outset of returning to school, they do not. What is far more important are the core academic course requirements that each state sets for the completion of a degree at all levels from associate’s through masters.

Regardless of the school, or state, each degree program carries a well-defined and specific amount of basic academic courses that must be complete to graduate. These requirements generally include communications, math, history, physical sciences i.e.; biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics, as well as, humanities, history, government, and depending on the type of degree one is pursuing, some carry a foreign language requirement.

To better prepare for academic advisement prior to meeting with an adviser at the college, go ahead and obtain a copy of any previous college transcripts since it will undoubtedly be part of the enrollment process anyway. Access to these records are generally made available through online services like Parchment or the National Student Clearing House for a small fee.

It is also important to keep in mind that there are two distinct types of transcript records: an ‘official’ copy and an ‘unofficial’ copy. Sounds important right, and it is because colleges will not accept an unofficial copy of a transcript record for enrollment.

An ‘official’ copy of a transcript record means that it is in a sealed envelope and specifically marked as such. Remember, general studies degree plans help save both time and money, as well as, provide the flexibility to explore different disciplines while still fulfilling the state’s academic courses requirements, which in turn, will make returning to school more palatable.

Please note the views and opinions expressed in the written works contained within this site are solely those of the individual authors themselves. They are not intended to, nor meant to imply any type of endorsement, professional relationship, or affiliation to any of the individual people, organizations, or associations mentioned in the site’s publication. All written work is the sole property of the author of this website and may be subject to copyright laws 2019.

In My Opinion Political Parties Keep Would-Be Voters From the Polls

Arbitrarily might our nation be better off if political parties did not exist. Political parties are said to be an essential part of creating balanced power, but have we not learned from history that notions of true bipartisanship in our government has been at best, an inglorious afterthought. If democracy is defined as a government by the people and for the people, one might argue that the existence of political parties only undermines the true meaning of its merit, which is impartiality. Today, in a nation like ours, one that is already so terribly divided and suffering from things like dissonance and the negative impacts of socioeconomic barriers, is it fair to say that political parties only divide us further, and consequently keeping potential voters from going to the polls.

If one considers presidential history, Presidents; Washington, Lincoln, F. Roosevelt, Johnson, and Reagan all made significant decisions that have dissented from political party positioning. Historians have widely lamented that our nation’s first president George Washington reviled the idea of political parties. And when our nation’s sixteenth President Abraham Lincoln was elected to office, politicians that were once his adversaries were assigned to the executive cabinet based on the premise that if not, the nation would otherwise be deprived of potentially great service. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a democrat, also went against both the left and the right, as well as, the nation’s highest court to institute The New Deal in response to the socioeconomic fallout from The Great Depression (1929-1933).

Amid the turbulent 1960’s then President Lyndon B. Johnson, a staunch democrat from Texas, signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 facing opposition in congress from Southern Democrats who opposed the bill, which ultimately led to the longest running filibuster in Senate history. Two decades later, ignoring bipartisan opposition from both sides of the aisle, President Ronald Reagan signed the Social Security Reform Act of 1983, yet again showing the nation that a president can depart from a political party affiliation to do something believed to be for the greater good of society as a whole.

These great leaders put forth meritorious efforts to lead our nation by showing the rationality of personal merit within a democracy by being individuals apart from their political parties. If such is fact, then might there be truth in the belief that political parties only create a greater divide among voters, and would we not be better served to abolish political parties altogether.

Please note the views and opinions expressed in the written works contained within this site are solely those of the individual authors themselves. They are not intended to, nor meant to imply any type of endorsement, professional relationship, or affiliation to any of the individual people, organizations, or associations mentioned in the site’s publication. All written work is the sole property of the author of this website and may be subject to copyright laws 2019.