Adults Returning to College Ought to Consider a General Studies Degree Plan

Returning to school as an adult can be a frightening notion, not just for the prospective student but in most instances for the entire family as well. For adults, the decision to return to school might have substantial implications nevertheless if the opportunity comes along, seize the moment. It is by far one of the most revitalizing soul-searching journeys a person can take, and if nothing else, you will indeed learn a thing or two about yourself because returning to college as an adult is a spot-on test of one’s character. If I could make just one recommendation to an adult person contemplating a return to school, it would be to consider a general studies degree plan first.

As if the admissions process itself is not challenging enough, once accepted there is still; the financial aid process, academic advisement, degree planning, purchasing books, and just wait till the first full day of classes on campus, to say the least, returning to school is about perseverance. If one is not careful, a poorly planned academic program can inevitably cost the student both time and money. Although considering personal aspirations and educational goals are highly important in the context of an end game outcome, with respect to the first, or even second semester back in school as an adult, it is not as significant as one might think.

Although academic advisers are sometimes inclined to suggest that major and minor selections need to be declared at the outset of returning to school, they do not. What is far more important are the core academic course requirements that each state sets for the completion of a degree at all levels from associate’s through masters.

Regardless of the school, or state, each degree program carries a well-defined and specific amount of basic academic courses that must be complete to graduate. These requirements generally include communications, math, history, physical sciences i.e.; biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics, as well as, humanities, history, government, and depending on the type of degree one is pursuing, some carry a foreign language requirement.

To better prepare for academic advisement prior to meeting with an adviser at the college, go ahead and obtain a copy of any previous college transcripts since it will undoubtedly be part of the enrollment process anyway. Access to these records are generally made available through online services like Parchment or the National Student Clearing House for a small fee.

It is also important to keep in mind that there are two distinct types of transcript records: an ‘official’ copy and an ‘unofficial’ copy. Sounds important right, and it is because colleges will not accept an unofficial copy of a transcript record for enrollment.

An ‘official’ copy of a transcript record means that it is in a sealed envelope and specifically marked as such. Remember, general studies degree plans help save both time and money, as well as, provide the flexibility to explore different disciplines while still fulfilling the state’s academic courses requirements, which in turn, will make returning to school more palatable.

Please note the views and opinions expressed in the written works contained within this site are solely those of the individual authors themselves. They are not intended to, nor meant to imply any type of endorsement, professional relationship, or affiliation to any of the individual people, organizations, or associations mentioned in the site’s publication. All written work is the sole property of the author of this website and may be subject to copyright laws 2019.

Author: Mike

Amateur Writer, Sports Fan, Guitar Player, and Collector of all things Sports and Music.

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